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Pheed and Sulia: Two New Social Networks for the Nonprofit Early Adopters

March 27, 2013

DiffusionOfInnovationNonprofits that have the capacity to be early adopters have learned that early adoption in and of itself is a wise social media strategy. Followers tend to grow the fastest during the early adoption phase and being one of the first nonprofits to have a presence on a new social network tends to solidify their popularity on the social network over time. For example, the National Wildlife Federation was an early adopter of Google+ and now they have more followers on Google+ than on Facebook and Twitter combined. That said, there’s no guarantee that investing time in experimenting with a new social network will pay off, but Pheed and Sulia are two new social networks that early adopter nonprofits should be paying attention to. Also, if you decide to become an early adopter and want to promote your Pheed and Sulia profiles on your website, blog and e-newsletter, you can right-click to download the Pheed and Sulia icons on the right side of this blog.

1. Pheed :: pheed.com :: pheed.com/nonprofitorgs

Primarily a mobile social network, Pheed also allows easy desktop publishing of status updates, photos, video and audio files, and enables users to broadcast live. With 81% of its users currently between the ages of 14 and 25, nonprofits that are trying to engage youth should at the very least sign up, reserve their username, and post at least once a week.

Pheed


2. Sulia :: sulia.com :: sulia.com/nonprofitorgs

Rather than following others on Sulia, users “Trust” brands that provide good content. What I most like about Sulia is that unlike any other social network which heavily prioritizes the business community, Sulia launched with a “Non-profits and NGOs” channel – a very wise decision in that nonprofits are a powerhouse on the Social Web. Most content on Sulia is currently coming from RSS feeds, but as each channel has a Leaderboard, early adopter nonprofits would be wise to create an account using their Twitter login, grab their username, and post authentic content in order to move up the ranks on the Non-profits and NGOs Leaderboard:

Sulia


For Your Reference ::  The Early Adoption Curve

salereaping

Related Links:
Free Webinar on April 18: 11 Steps to Launching a Successful Social Media Strategy for Your Nonprofit
Pheed: The Next Social Network for Teens?
Sulia: The Hottest Social Network you’ve Never Heard Of

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9 Comments leave one →
  1. Editor permalink
    March 27, 2013 11:09 am

    Reblogged this on Social Media Marketing for Non-Profits.

  2. April 2, 2013 9:21 pm

    I signed up for Pheed a little while ago, but haven’t had a chance to play with it much. I just signed up for Sulia, but it’s kind of making me crazy. I signed up for my personal account using Facebook and for my nonprofit using Twitter. Every time I trust someone, it generates a tweet or a Facebook post, even though I have those turned off under settings. Have you had that same issue? It seems like a cool social tool, but it sure will piss off our Twitter followers if it spits out a tweet every time I trust someone on Sulia!

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